Wednesday, 26 November 2008

Contingency 7 - John of Ripa (work in progress)

Dear Everyone,

As promised, and finally (I apologize for the delay), I'm going to publish John of Ripa on future contingency. The post of today is a bit different from the others, since the full text will come before explaining our author's position about future contingency; the topic exposition will be in a form of commentaries besides the text. In other words we will have:
- Introduction to John's philosophical figure;
- Full text: Lectura in Primum Sententiarum, dist. 38 q.2 & dist. 39
- Commentary: Commented text of the Lectura dist. 38 & 39

John of Ripa, born in Ripatransone in the centre of Italy, lectured on the Sentences in Paris in the first middle of the XIV century. In Paris, were he was an acknowledged master, John came in touch with the doctrine of previous parisian masters, he studied in depth the works of Duns Scotus, and knew the positions of the English theologians. The questions that John deals with are sometimes taken by the contemporary debate, like the question about the beatific vision, which was an highly disputed theme at the Papal court in Avignon. His production is not big quantitatively, but remarkable qualitatively. Among his writings we can find:
- The Commentary (plus some reportationes) on the Sentences: John lectured on all the four books of the Sentences. Nevertheless, as was becoming usual at that time, the Commentary on the First book is dominant in estension, complexity and richness of themes. In particular, the Prologue to the Lectura on the First of the Sentences is an extensive and deep coverage of his fundamental positions about the metaphysics of the form, the epistemology, the gnoseology and the theory of the beatific vision. The main body of his Commentary on the first book of the Sentences deals with the distinction and the relationships between the divine persons; in particular, it is in this section of his commentary that John shows himself as a scotist, and it is characteristic his use of the formal disctinction doctrine.
- Conclusiones: this work is a report about the organisation and the fundamental conclusions of the whole Commentary.
- Determinationes: this is maybe the most challenging writings of John. In this work John recalls and defends the main arguments of the Prologue to the Commentary of the First book and in particular criticizes the position of a confriar, master Ascensius de Sainte Colombe. In this work we can find exposed with great efficacy the themes related to the metaphysics of the divine essence, the theory of the formal degree, the distinction and the relationships between the faculties of the soul, the progression of the species throughout the soul facoulties, the metaphysics and the psicology of the beatific vision.
Although it is doubtless that John of Ripa belongs to the Scotistic school, we must think about John as an original and very refined thinker. The complexity and, in some extent, the difficulty of his thought justify the surname of "Doctor Supersubtilis" or "Difficilis" that his students gave him.
His work is interesting for many reasons:
- his theology is a precious example of the franciscan scholastic tradition, due to his constant research for a connection between the speculative and the practical habit of theology, between speculation and contemplation.
- he shows a great interest in topics related to knowledge, faculties of the soul, and he's a prolific author about the issus of theological psicology and epistemology
- he's a great metaphysicist of the form. His metaphysics shows a clear scotistic origin, as far as the choice of terms and the instruments of demostration are concerned.
- his demonstrative ways and his conclusions are often original and he always seems somehow concerned to distinguish and demonstrate the uniqueness of his view.
- his writings are rich in dialogues and academical disputations with contemporary doctors, but in a way really different from that we find in English commentaries. John creates a dialogue between autorities and contemporary authors and participates to this dialogue when his opinion differs. Unlike many of his parisian and English colleagues, who used to recall in distinct sessions the opinions of previous or contemporary masters, John shows relationships and similarities and groups the authorities according to conceptual criteria. Moreover, he's also very punctual in citations and in defining the origin and the references of the authors he mentions.
- John takes care about the choice of topics, the way to explain and the deepening of arguments. He's a theologian who deals with few themes but very deeply, the metaphysics of substance, the formal relationships, the theory of knowledge, the scientific epistemology, the psicology of theology and of divine vision. The way to explain is wide and highly thoroughly. No argument is neglected and everything is trated with great completeliness but also without being superfluous.
John of Ripa is a great theologian and metaphysic. His work is characterized by an high level of thematic and styilistic coherence. The foundations of his metaphysics are homogeneously distributed throughout the theory of knowledge and the theology. Although it is, in this case, fair to claim that in John's docrtine, the speculative habit of theology has a great importance, it would be unfair to say that John has been a natural theologian. On the contrary, in John, metaphysis and speculative theology constitute the scientific contest of the beatific vision. The ultimate end of his inquiry is always a christian theme, in particular concerning the divine essence and the beatific vision.


==============================================================================

Full Text:
John of Ripa
Lectura in Primum Sententiarum, dist. 38, q.2 & dist. 39 (full text)


DISTINCTIO 38
QUAESTIO SECUNDA



Circa eamdem distinctionem quero istam questionem:
Utrum divina essentia respectu futurorum contingentium sit evidens et clara notitia?
Iuxta questionem quatuor erunt articoli.

Primus articulus erit ostendere
Si divina essentia sit omnium futurorum verorum notitia et per quid ut per rationem cognoscendi.
Pro cuius declaratione st hec
Prima conclusio: Eternitas divina non ex hoc quod durative immensa est evidens ratio cognoscendi futura.
Patet, nam divina eternitas non est simul presens toti fluxui immaginario temporis, immo nec diversis instantibus, sicut patuit distinctione nona. Aliter enim esset preteritum vel futurum respectu eternatati realiter et per consequens agere contingenter vel necessario Deus respiceret futurum sicut preteritum et e contra et equalem respectu utriusque libertatem haberet; quod non reputo probabile.
Seconda conclusio: Immensitas intellectus divini ut sic non potest esse sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam, quantumcumque intellectus divinus ponatur immensus in esse potentie perceptive et cognitive, adhoc non ex hoc habet quod distincte cognoscat nedum vera contingentia de rebus creatis, sed etiam ipsasmet entitates creatas incomplexe. Unde intellectus divino ut potentia cognitiva non habet continentiam perfectionalem vel causalem respectu creature nisi secundum rationem in creatura denominationis consimilis, nam intellectus divinus, licet ut potentia intellectiva immensa contineat perfectionaliter et exemplariter totam latitudinem potentie intellective causalis ut sic et ideo secundum hoc sit ratio idealis sibimet cognoscendi totam huiusmodi latitudinem, non tamen est ratio perfectionaliter continendi sive causaliter omnem aliam perfectionem causalem.
Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic. Quodlibet verum eo ipso quod est verum est scibile et eo ipso ab immensa intelligentia est intelligibile, et quia, posita ratione sue immensitatis, est somme actualis, ideo eo ipso ipsum intelligeret; et ideo prima intelligentia, quantumcumque poneretur non activa, adhuc intelligeret omne verum contingens, si tale poneretur. Ad istam rationem dico quod, licet .a. intelligentia sit somme actualis, tamen veri non esset causativa ad extra, sicut non esset aliis causa essendi, ita ipsa non relucerent in sua essentia et per consequens non intelligeret talia vera ad extra per soam existentiam.
Tertia conclusio: Divina essentia non ex hoc quod est intensive immensa potest esse evidens ratio cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam divina essentia secundum quamlibet perfectionem simpliciter est intensive immensa ei tamen non quelibet huismodi ratio est sibi sufficiens evidenter cognosecndi huiusmodi vera nec eidem necessaria vera nec omnia Vera incomplexe signabilia ut patet ex preedentibus; igitur, etc.
Quarta conclusio: Divina essentia secundum nullam rationem intrinsecam soppositalem potest esse veri contingentis evidens ratio seu notitia.
Patet, nam nulla talis ratio potest esse formalis notitia intellectui divino.
Quinta conclusio: Secondum nullam rationem essentialem que dicat perfectionem simpliciter divina essentia potest esse veri contingentis evidens notitia.
Patet, nam cum qualibet tali eque stat suum oppositum esse verum sicut ipsum.
Sexta conclusio: Non ex hoc quod divina essentia est universaliter perfecta est evidens ratio cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam sit .a., quoddam verum contingens; tunc sic: stat divinam essentiam simpliciter esse perfectam et ipsam non representare .a.; igitur, etc. Antecedens probatur, nam si non, igitur quam contingens vel necessarium est divinam essentiam representare a., tam contingens vel necessarium est divinam essentiam esse simpliciter perfectam; igitur divina essentia vel necessario representat .a. et per consequens .a. necessario erit, vel divina essentia potest esse non simpliciter perfecta.
Septima conclusio: divina essentia secundum nullam rationem intrinsecam est sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi aliqua vera contingentia.
Patet, nam, quaecumque tali ratione cum stat equaliter cuiuslibet contingentis oppositum esse verum sicut ipsum.
Octava conclusio: Secundum rationem intrinsecam contingentem et solum secundum causalem est sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam intellectus divinus cognoscit vera contingentia, et non per aliquod extrinsecum divine essentie quod ad huiusmodi visionem concurrit nec formaliter nec causaliter; igitur solum per suam essentiam et sibi intrinsecam, et non per aliquam rationem necessariam, ut patet ex dictis; igitur per solam rationem contingentem ut causalem evidentiam infallibilem apparentiam de tali vero. Dico autem hic “rationem contingentem” istam, scilicet, que contingenter denominat formaliter et intrinsece divinam essentiam. Unde, licet quelibet ratio intrinseca divine essentie sit realiter ipsamet divina essentia, et per consequens quedan entitas absolute necessaria, tamnen secundum suum proprium esse formale et denominationem intrinsecam correspondentem contingenter.
Nona conclusio: Cuilibet vero contingenti enuntianti aliqualiter esse vel formaliter de creatura correspondet in divina essentia ratio genitiva necessario inferens a priori tale verum.
Probatur. Nam quodlibet verum extrinsecum relucet in divina essentia a priori causaliter tanquam verum secundarium in primo vero; igitur, cuilibet tali correspondet in divina essentia aliqua ratio a qua habet esse verum tanquam a causa et a priori causaliter necessario inferente huiusmodi verum.
Decima conclusio: Cuilibet tali vero correspondet in divina essentia huiusmodii ratio et evidentia et in hoc prima est et summa contingentia.
Patet, nam, sicut antecedens necessarium inferens necessario consequens a priori est magis necessarium quam consequens, ita antecedens causale et contingens est magis contingens.
Secundo. Effectus provenit ex modo agendi cause; igitur oninis contingentia in effectu reducitur in causam; igitur cum esse verum contingens de creatura inferatur a priori causaliter ex ratione divina contingenti, que est sibi causalis evidentia, sequitur quod in huiusmodi ratione, ex qua necessario sequitur buiusmodi verum contingens, est prima et summa contingentia.
Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic. Ex ipsa sequitur quod Deus est aliqualis intrinsece et potest non esse talis et per consequens Deus est potentialis intrinsece.
Secundo. Sequitur quod Deus est mutabilis, nam, si Dcus fuit aliqualis intrinsece et nunc non est, talis potest desinere esse talis.
Tertio. Quidquid est aliquale contingenter est ab aliquo tale; igitur, cum quodlibet intrinsecum Deo sit Deus et per consequens non ab alio, sequitur quod nullum intrinsecum Deo potest esse contingens aliquale.
Quarto. Sequitur e converso quod Deus potest esse aliqualis intrinsece qualis non est, et per consequens Deus est potentialis.
Pro solutione istorum rationum est primo advertendum quod omnis potentia que est in Deo huiusmodi rationes continens hahet ipsas non ut perfectiones actuales, nam non minus sine eis talis potentia esset perfecta simpliciter, sed solum ut determinationes sue contingentie et indifferentie ad agendum.
Secundo advertendum quod quantumcumque aliqua ratio sit intrinseca alieni potentie tibi talis maiorem ponat perfectionem in potentia non sequitur in ipsa potentialitas. Ad hoc enim quod concludatur ista potentialitas requiritur quod talis sit actus talis potentie et ipsius perfectio. Et per hoc patet quod secunda consequentia prime rationis non valet. Stat enim aliqod per huiusmodi rationem non esse tale, et tamen ipsum immutatur et in potentialiter tale. Et ta respondetur ad sccondam et primam rationem.
Ad tertiam, dico quod stat aliquid esse somme contingentie aliqualiter intrinsece et tamen non ab alio tale, ita quod ista alietas denotet distinctionem realem, nam voluntas divina est volens ad extra et contingenter et non ab aliquo alio quam a voluntate divina.
Contra modum ponendi eiusdem conclusionis arguitur. Nam ex ipsa sequitur quod in Deo sunt duo principia prima complexe et unum non est reducibile ad reliquum; quod est impossibile. Consequentia probatur, nam primum principium in ordine verorum contingentium non est reducibile ad aliquod verum necessarium, cum ex vero necessario nullo modo sequitur verum contingens, nec principium primum in ordine necessariorum est aliquo modo reducibile ad verum contingens tanquam ad prius, cum verum contingens non possit esse causa veri necessarii.
Secondo sic. Quodlibet verum quod est principium primum in ordine verorum contingentium est intrinsece et immense verum, cum sit ratio cognoscendi intellectui divino alia vera contingentia; sed quodlibet tale enuntiat de Deo aliqualiter esse secondum aliquam perfectionem simpliciter; igitur, aliquod verum contingens est in Deo dicens perfectionem simpliciter; quod claudit contradictionem.
Ad rationes. Ad primam, nego consequentiam et ad probationem dico quod verum primum contingens, licet non inferatur ex vero necessario, tamen aliquo modo emanat ab ipso, quoniam aliquid est causa a priori huius veri contingentis, licet non causa determinans antecedenter ita quod necessario inferat tale verum.
Ad secondam rationem, dico quod stat aliquod esse immensum formaliter verum secundum propria et formalem suam denominationem, et tamen non ex hoc ponere aliquam perfectionem et hoc est generaliter verum cum denominatio consimilis finita non contineretur formaliter vel causaliter in tali denominatione, sicut patet de velle divino et dicere ad extra. Deus enim immense vult ad extra quidquid vult vel dicit, et tamen tale velle et dicere non dicit aliquam perfectionem in Deo distinctam a perfectione potentie intellective vel volitive. Et hoc est quia nullum dicere creature vel velle continetur perfectionaliter vel causaliter in dicere divino ad extra vel velle, nam non minus voluntas divina contineret perfectionaliter et causaliter omnem creaturam etsi Deus nihil ad extra actualiter diceret vel vellet.

Secundus articulus.
Utrum huiusmodi rationes cognoscendi futura in divina essentia sint varie ci aliquo modo distincte?
Pro cuius determinatione sit hec.
Prima conclusio: Quelibet ratio contingens et prima in esse contingentie in divina essentia est alicuius indifferentie sue potentie determinativa.
Probatur. Nam quelibet talis ratio est in sua potentia aliquo modo et cum huiusmodi ratio non habeat in potentia previam antecedentem rationem determinantem ipsam ad esse, nam tunc non esset in ipsa prima, igitur talis ratio est determinativa indifferentie sue potentie, et habeiur intentum.
Secunda conclusio: cuilibet vero contingenti de creatura distincto ab altero vero, seu distincte visibili in Verbo sine altero, correspondet in divina essentia ratio propria cognitiva et distincta.
Probatur. Nani si a. ci .b., veris contingentibus distinctis, correspondet eadem ratio, sit ista e. Tunc sic: c. est totalis evidentia intellectui divino respectu. a. ci .b.; igitur non stat c. videri et non cognosci evidenter tam .a. quam .b., et per eonsequens non stat aliquem intellectum videre a. in Verbo et non videre .b., et e converso. Cuius oppositum ponebatur.
Secondo. Pono quod Gabriel videat in c. a. ci non b., et postea videat a. et .b simul; in hoc caso ex hoc quod Gabriel noviter vited b. immutatur intrinsece; igitur vel ratio immediate represetive immutat intensius intellectum Gabrielin nunc quam prius, vel secundum alaim rationem immutat. Si secundum, babeo intentum; si primum ex hoc sequitur idlem, videlicet quod prius, sed intensius, ut notum est.
Tertia conclusio: Cuilibet vero contingenti de creatura correspondet in divina essentia ratio cognitiva distincta et immediate terminativa.
Antecedens talis veri contingentis de creaturas.
Patet ex priori.
Quarta conclusio: Cuilibet vero contingenti de creatura, sive enunciet positive, sive negative et distincte, intelligibili sine altero correspondet in divina essentia ratio cognitiva distincta.
Patet, nam quodlibet tale relucet in divina essentia: sed nulla ratio formaliter in divina essentia necessaria potest esse immediate cognitiva alicuius contingentis; igitur, etc.
Quinta conclusio: Cuilibet tali vero distincto ab altero in creaturis correspondet in divina essentia primum verum contingens in ordine verorum contingentium.
Patet, nam infinita sunt vera contingentia distincte enunciativa de creaturis, quorum quodlibet est distincte scibile et visibile in Verbo sine altero, et cuilibet tali vero correspondet in divina essentia ratio cognitiva propria in qua est prima contingentia et nullum verum est reducibile ad alterum; igitur, etc.

Tertius articulus.
Ostendit per quid divina essentia sit ratio cognoscendi peccata futura vel presentia, cum ista nullo modo reluceant causaliter in ea.
Pro cuius decisione sit hec
Prima conclusio: Nulli rei incommunicabilis positive in creatura correspondet distincta et propria ratio idealis in divina essentia.
Probatur. Nam nulla ratio incommunicabilis est sub aliquo gradu perfectionis ut sic, et per consequens non est participatio divine essentie et ratio immediate derivabilis ab ipsa.
Secunda conclusio: Nulla talis ratio incommunicabilis est incomplexe a divina essentia intelligibilis nec in se, nec in aliquo representativo proprio et immediato.
Probatur. Quod non in se patet, et quod non ab alio eius representativo patet ex precedenti conclusione.
Tertia conclusio: Nullum verum enuncians necessario vel contingenter de aliqua tali incommunicabili ratione habet in divina essentia rationem propriam representativam distinctam.
Patet, nam nulla talis est incomplexe intelligibilis isto modo nec complete; igitur, etc.
Quarta conclusio: Nullam rationem incommunicabilem esse vel non esse, fore vel non fore, est antecedenter intelligibile ab intellectu divino in aliqua propria ratione causali.
Patet, nam, sicut divina essentia non potest esse ars et ratio causalis propria respectu huius rationis, ita nec respectu esistere vel fore talis rationis. Dico igitur quod divina essentia, secundum eamdem rationem artis et continentie causalis qua continet rationes essentiales in creaturis et qua est ratio cognoscendi eas immediate, est etiam ratio cognoscendi omnem incommunicabilem rationem, que necessario consurgit ex eis, sicut in divinis rationes suppositales vel notionales non sunt ex se intelligibiles, sed in essentialibus rationibus. Eodem modo est dicendum de difformitatibus creaturarum quod, quia necessario cunsurgunt ex positivis determinatis causaliter a Deo et habentibus rationes cognitivas necessarias et contingentes in dixina essentia, ideo in huiusmodi rationibus divinis intelliguuntur tam complexe quam incomplexe, quoad omnem conditionem necessariam vel contingentem de ipsis. Si enim Deus novit Sortes allicere a., et .a. est peccatum, tunc novit Sortem peccare et eque intense unum sicut reliquum, quia in eadem ratione cognitiva licet causali et determinativa primi et non secundi. Eque enim intense scit consequens sicut antecedens, licet non eodem modo.
Sed hic movetur instantia, nam quidquid est causa cause est causa causati; igitur, quidquid est causa signabilis antecedentis est causa signabilis conseqtientis; igitur, etc.
Dicitur quod licet voluntas creata ponatur causa peccati non tamen nisi defectiva, et ideo, quantumcumque voluntas divina sit causa voluntatis create et sui positivi agere, tamen, quia non eodem modo causalitatis, non sequitur quud sit causa ipsius peccare. Et ita dicatur de rationibus incommunicabilibus.
Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic: Peccatum esse est verum, igitur, de prima veritate.
Secundo. Peccatum esse relucet in divina essentia et nihil relucet in ipsa nisi velut in representativo priori et causali; igitur Deus est causa peccati. Si dicitur quod nun relucet, igitul Deus non intelligit peccatum esse.
Ad primam dico quod peccatum esse est verum a prima veritate, non tamen causali et determinativa alicuius previi ex quo necessario sequitur peccare.
Patet, nam, sicut non est possibile quod Deus incipiat, ita non est possibile quod deficiat: sicut enim primum dicit mutationent in Deo ita et secundum. Unde beatus Augustinus, 10 De Civitate Dei: “Deus, inquit, in sua natura non corporaliter sed spiritualiier, non sensibiliter vel supernaturaliter sed intelligibiliter [non temporaliter] sed, ut ita dicam, eternaliter nec incipit loqui nec desinit”.
Secundo. Si Deus incipit aliquod verum scire, sit igitur quod incipiat [scire] huiusmodi verum, puta me sedere; quod sit .a.; tunc sic: intellectus divinus nunc primo est sciens .a.; igitur memoria divina nunc primo habet divinam scientiam ut speciem representativam .a. veri; igitur intelligentia divina nunc primo est Verbum de .a. vero postquam non fuit; igitur Verbum divinum non est eternaliter Verbum de quolibet vero quod relucet in paterna scientia; cuius oppositum expresse docet Augusiinus, XV De Trinitate, c. 14, circa finem.
Tertio diceretur hic quod Verbum divinum habet se sicut pura forma intrinsece quoad substantiam, tamen esi temporaliter Verbum de verbo mutabili nec hoc arguit in ipso mutationem sed solum in re mutabili.
Contra. Nam substantia anime semper presens proprio intellectui non potest habere verbum noviter sine sua mutatione, qualitercumque sit mutatio in re extra; igitur.
Iteni. Si me sedere nunc primo esset verum et Verbum divinum nunc primo esset Gabrieli Verbum de tali visione, intellectus Gabrielis noviter mutaretur; igitur multo magis si intellectus divinus nunc primo in sua natura loquitur tale Verbum et divina essentia nunc primo intellectui divino est ratio cognoscendi huiusmodi Verbum, intellectus divinus ex hoc noviter mutatur.
Tertio principaliter arguitur sic. Quodlibet preteritum, presens vel futurum, est presens divine essentie, per beatum Augustinuni, V Super Genesim et non nisi ut terminus divine essentie; igitur respectu euius intellectus est vel fuit scientia nunc est, et per consequens quodlibet verum de re mutabili immutabiliter et presentialiter scitur ab intellectu divino. Unde qua ratione res futura signabilis incomplexe et preterita immuiabiliter scitur in Verbo Dei, et etiam quodlibet signabile complexe futurum vel preteritum.
Quarta conclusio: Quodlibet verum contingens enuncians qualitercumque esse de re mutabili fuisse set fore, immutabiliter verum est nec potest incipere nec desinere verum esse.
Probatur. Nam cuilibet tali vero correspondet aliqualis ratio intrinseca in divina essentia, qua cognita, necessario sequitur cognitio talis veri et, qua posita, necessario ponitur tale verum; sed quelibet talis ratio est eterna.
Secundo. Quodlibet verum immutabiliter est scitum ab intellecto divino; igitur immutabiliter est verum.
Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic. Si enim quodlibet verum est immutabiliter verum, sequitur quod quidquid erit verum est verum; sed Antichristum esse aliquando erit verum, igitur nunc est verum.
Secundo. Si quodlibet verum immutabiliter erit verum, igitur quelibet propositio vera immutabiliter erit vera et per consequens nulla propositio potest incipere vel desinere esse vera.
Ad primam, concedo quod omne signabile complexe, quod aliquando erit verum vel aliquando fuit verum, nunc est verum.
Et cum dicitur: « Antichristum esse, aliquando erit verum », vel loqueris de ista propositione : « Antichristus est », vel de signabili complexe. Si primo modo, non est ad propositum; non enim omnis propositio immutabiliter est vera, licet suum significatum immutabiliter sit verum, quia ipsa mutabiliter significat, nam continue habet aliud et aliud significabile complexe sibi correspondens; unde idem est Antichristum esse et Antichristum esse in presenti instanti et continue sicut est aliud et aliud instans, ita aliud et aliud instans significatur et pro alio et alio instanti videtur; immo, si ista: « Antichristum est » nunc sit vera et continue post hoc, immutabiliter esset et nullo modo variaret suum significatum: continue post hoc significaret Antichristum fuisse in .a., et cum .a. continue significasset Antichristuni fore in .a., et cum .a. continue significasset Antichristum fore in .a., ideo esset immutabiliter vera; sed, quia significatum propositionis nullo modo dependet ab ipsa propositione, ideo qualitercumque variet significatum, ex qua varietate sit mutabiliter vera, non sequitur aliqua mutabilitas sui significati quoad esse verum vel falsum. Et sic patet responsio ad istam rationem.
Verumtamen pro pleniori declaratione sit hec
Prima propositio. Quilibet intellectus, qui, per impossibile quodlibet significabile verum de creatura intelligeret in se ipso signante et non in aliquo medio actu creato immutabiliter ipsum sciret.
Patet, nam omnino idem est me esse quod prius fuit me fore et posterius erit me fusse. Non enim sciens me fore pro tali instanti aliquid novi scit.
Seconda propositio. Quodlibet intellectus creatus huiusmodi vera sciens per propositiones ex hoc mutabiliter ipsa scit, quoniam concipit per propositiones mutabiliter huiusmodi vera significantes et continue aliud et aliud signantes.
Patet ex dictis.
Tertia propositio. Quilibet intellectus in Verbo sciens aliquod verum contingens de creatura immutabiliter ipsum scit si ipsum apprehendat.
Patet, nam quodlibet tale verum immutabiliter est verum et ratio cngnoscendi huiusmodi, puta divina essentia, immutahiliter ipsum representat, et sic patet quod ad hoc quod propositio sit immutabiliter vera non sufficit quod suum signatum sit immntabiliter verum, sed requiritur quod illud immutabiliter representet.



DISTINCTIO 39
QUAESTIO UNICA


Circa distinctionem tricesimam nonam in qua Magister tractat utrum divina scientia sit causa rerum vel potius e converso, quero istam questionem:
Utrum divina scientia respectu cuiuscumque veri contingentis de creatura generaliter sit causalis?
In isto articulo erunt quatuor articuli.

Primus articulus.
Utrum intellectus divinus ex sola determinatione voluntatis divine contingentia vera sciat?
Pro cuius determinatione sit hec
Prima conclusio: Sola voluntas divina est in Deo principium liberum et contingens equaliter.
Et sumo hic « voluntatem » non in esse potentie vitalis, ut perceptive, sed solum ut productive.
Probo igitur conclusionem sic. Nam, si non, maxime hoc est propter intellectum divinum, et, si sic, sequitur quod ita intellectus divinus est ex se potentia indifferens et productiva potentia sicut voluntas, et ita, cum intellectus creatus, quantum participat de perfectionali esse intellectus divini tantum de modo principiandi correspondenti, sequitur quod intellectus creatus, ut potentia distincta a voluntate, est potentia formaliter libera. Consequens falsum, nam tunc agere intellectus, subducto agere voluntatis, esset imputabile solo intellectui, immo ita imputabile sicut agere voluntatis; cuius oppositum notum est.
Seconda conclusio: Voluntas est immense principium formaliter liberum seu contingens equaliter.
Probatur. Nam voluntas divina ita intense est libera et contingens equaliter in agendo sicut est potentia productiva; modus enim producendi quantificatur penes gradum producend; sed voluntas divina immensa est piltentia productiva; igitur, etc.
Tertia conclusio: Voluntas divina per idem formaliter et intrinsece est potens agere et non agere quodcumque ad quod contingenter refertur.
Probatur. Quia si non, sit igitur .b. alicuius contingenti derivabile ab .a. voluntate divina; sit .c., ratio per quam .a. est potens ad esse .b. et .d. ratio per quam est potens ad non esse .b.; tunc sic: .c. ratio precise respicit esse .b. et .d. ex se determinatur ad non esse .b.; igitur nec .c. nec .d. est ratio causalis formaliter libera; sed .a. non correspondet ratio talis respectu .b., igitur nisi .c. nec .d.; igitur .a. non est potentia formaliter libera respectu .b.; immo sequitur quod aliquid est violentum in Deo, videlicet suspensio agendi ipsi .c. que esset sibi violenta, et sequitur quod determinationes naturales et contrarie sunt in Deo intrinsece; quorum quodlibet est falsum.
Quarta conclusio: Voluntas divina respectu cuiuscumque effectus producinilis ad extra est intrinsece predeterminabilis per actum volendi vel nolendi, seu velle vel nolle.
Probatur. Nam si non, plus Deum velle vel nolle dicit determinationem intrinsecam Deo quam Deum agere vel non agere, igitur non plus ad Deum velle noviter vel nolle, diligere vel odire, sequitur mutatio in voluntate divina quam ad Deum esse noviter dominum vel principium creatore. Utrobique enim esset denominatio nova relativa extrinseca et non intrinseca; cuius oppositum dicit Augustinns, XV de Trinitate, c. ultimo.
Ouinta conclusio: Prima et suprema libertas voluntatis divine est immediate respectu predeterminationis intrinsece, puta nolle vel velle ad extra.
Probatur. Nam voluntas divina prius est volens ad extra quam sit agens ad extra et ipsam sic velle ad extra est denominatlo intrinseca voluntatis; igitur prius est voluntatem divinam habere libertatem et contingentiam ad sic selle quam ad sic agere. Unde voluntas creata primo et principaliter est libera respectn alicuius intrinseci et ex consequenti alicuius imperati; igitur, etc.
Sexta conclusio: Cuiuslibet veri contingentis de creatura ratio cognitiva in divina essentia est formaliter ipsa determinatio intrinseca voluntatis divine, puta volitio vel nolitio.
Probatur. Nam quelibet talis ratio cognitiva in Deo est posiyio contingentis equaliter, sed sola voluntas divina est principium liberum in divina essentia et prima eius libeitas seu contingentia refertur ad nolle vel velle predeterminatum ad extra; igitur sola huiusmodi predestinatio voluntatis divine ad extra, puta volitio vel nolitio, est ratio cognitiva et evidentia intellectui divino de quolibet tali vero contingenti de creatura.
Contra istam conclusionem arguit quidam contra Scotum probando quod non sit possibile intellectum divinum scire futura evidenter ex determinatione intrinseca voluntatis. Arguit primo sic. Nam, si aliquid determinatur contingenter ita quod possibile est ipsum nunquam fuisse determinatum per talem determinationem, non potest haberi evidentia certa et infallibilis de futuro.
Secundo. Ad determinationem voluntatis divine circa futuram existentiam dependentem a libertate voluntatis create qua necessario sequitur determinatio voluntatis create circa idem, aut non; si sic, igitur naturaliter agit voluntas creata sicut quecumcue alia naturalis; quod est falsum; si non, igitur ad sciendum utrum effectus ponetur vel non ponetur in esse non sufficit noscere determinationem voluntatis divine, sed oportet noscere cum hoc determinationem voluntatis create, que non cognoscitur per determinationem voluntatis divine et per consequens per talem determinationem Deus non hahet evidentem notitiam de futuris.
Iste rationes, si aliquid valent, concludunt quod nulla talis volitio vel nolitio Dei ad extra est de facto evidentia intellectui divino de huiusmodi futuris, et quod nullus intellectus creatus in divina essentia ut in ratione cognoscendi et arte representativa potest habere certam et infallibilem notitiam de futuris cognoscendo huiusmodi predestinationem voluntatis divine. Sed ista sunt omnino absurda et falsa. Arguo enim sic: voluntas divina vult .a. fore a voluntate creata; igitur .a. erit voluntate creata. Consequentia ista est evidens intellectui divino et significabile per antecedens est sibi existens per predestinationem volontatis; igitur et consequens.
Item. Cum tali volitione respectu contingentis non stat oppositoni contingentis; igitur est evidentia certa et infallibilis.
Ad primam igitur rationem, nego primam partem assumpti. Licet enim determinatio voluntatis divine possit numquam fuisse determinativa, et ideo possibile est intellectum divinum nescire .a. fore, non staret tamen huiusmodi determinationem esse et ipsam non esse intellectui divino evidentiam de .a. fore.
Ad secundam rationem, dico quod ad determinationem voluntatis divine necessario sequitur determinatio voluntatis create; et tunc, cum infertur quod voluntas creata naturaliter ageret, consequentia nihil valet. Eqee enim probaret quod non stat voluntatem divinam velle me agere et me contingenter agere, sed quod potest facere voluntatem creatam suum actum liberum et rationalem naturaliter agere; quorum utrumqoe est impossibile. Dico igitur qood talis necessitas non est neccssitas antecedens ad volontatem creatam agere; nam, cum tali determinatione volontatis divine infrustrabili stat contingentia volontatis create in agendo sicut ipsa deducta; sed talis necessitas est precise contingentie, non dico cuiuslibet contingentie sed causalis, que est consecutio necessaria in re unius ex altero; hec autem necessitas omnino impertinenter se habet ad omnem contingentiam in singuli per consequens.
Septima conclusio: intellectus divinus respectu cuiuslibet veri contingentis de creatura habet evidentem notitiam ex sola predestinatione extrinseca seu intrinseca voluntatis.
Probatur. Nam omnis ratio que est intellectui divino de tali vero est ratio contingens ut sic; igitur est a volontate divina ut a principio libero; igitur huiusmodi ratio est predestinatio voluntatis divine.
Octava conclusio: Respectu cuiuslibet veri contingentis de creatura scientia intellectus divini proprie est causalis et effectiva.
Probatur. Nam respectu cuiuslibet talis veri volitio divina tanquam ratio cognitiva et principalis causa est evidentia intellectui divino de tali vero; igitur, ete.
Secundo. Ouodlibet tale verom visum ab angelo in Verbo videtur ibi in sua principali ratione causali et determinativa, sicut patet per Augustinun, ubicumque loquitur de modo quo angeli sident in Verbo; igitur quodlibet tale verum videtur in Verbo Dei tanquam in scientia causaliter.
Item, istam conlusionem est Augustini, XV Trinitate, c. 13: « Universas, inquit, creaturas suas et spirituales et corporales non quia sunt ideo novit sed ideo sunt quia novit; quia igitur scivit creavit, non quia creavit scivit”.
Sed forte dicetur quod hoc est verum de notitia simplici signabilium incomplexe de creaturis, non tamen de veris signabilibus complexe. Sed hoc nihil est, nam sit .a. aliqua creatura futura significabilis incomplexe, sit .b. aliquid verum contingens quod non habet rationem eternalem et determinativam in Deo .b. potest relucere; igitur si non eternaliter sic relucet velut in causa, sequitur quod consimilli ratione .a. potest incipere relucere in Deo et ideo mirabile videtur cur potius oporteat creaturam signilicabilem incomplexe eternaliter dici et disponi in Deo velut in arte, quam quantumcumque evidentia complexe de creaturis.
Contra istam conclusionem aliqui imaginantur quod ad hoc quod Deus sit scientia respectu futuri, puta .a. fore, requiri tanquam principalis causa immensitas intellectus divini et tanquam concausa .a. fore.
Et ideo dicunt quod non ideo .a. erit quia Deus prescit, sed e converso. Quod probant et maxime de futuris dependentibus a voluntate creata, nam cuiuslibet talis effectus futuritio dependet a voluntate creata, igitur et Deum scire talem effectum esse vel fore. Consequentia patet, nam non stat Deum sic scire et hoc non fore; sed Deum sic scire non dependet immediate a voluntate creata, nisi quia facit sic fore; igitur sic fore est causa quare sic prescit fore; et concludunt quod ego possum facere quod Deus ab eterno scivit .a. fore, si .a. sit aetus in potestate mea et quod aliqualiter est et taliter semper fuit, et tamen ego possum facere quod non sic est nec aliquando fuit.
Ad hoc etiam adducunt quasdam auctoritates. Prima est Boethii, V de Consolatione, ubi ostendit quod non idcirco sic est quia vera est opinio, sed potius vera est opinio quia sic est. Et ita concludit de prescientia futuri. Seconda est Augustini, III de Libero arbitrio, c. 4, ubi ostendit quod eo modo presciuntur futura, quo evenient, et ideo ex modo eventus, tanquam ex causa, concludunt modum divine prescientie. Tertia est Magistri Sententiarum, dist. 35, ubi ostendit quod, licet prescientia Dei sit sua essentia, tamen, si nulla essent futura, nulla esset prescientia.
Sed isti dicunt errores. Nam Deum scire .a. fore simul et Deum dicere eternaliter .a. fore est intrinsecum ipsi Deo, et ideo faciunt ipsum intrinsece dependere ab actu extra se.
Secundo. Cum Deum scire .a. fore sit immensum, Deus enim est immensa scientia omnis veri, sequitur quod .a. fpre est immense potentie et causalitatis.
Tertio. Sequitur ex ista opinione quod in potestate mea est facere Deum immense et infallibiliter scire .a. fore; quia sequitur .a. erit, igitur Deus scit immense et infallibiliter .a. fore. Conclusio bona et significatum antecedentis est in potestate mea, igitur et significatum consequentis. Mirum est quod actus intellectus divini si magis in potestate mea quam actus intellectus mei.
Quarto. Omnis causa mutabilis mutabiliter continet causaliter quidquid continet; igitur, contradictio est quod immutabile esse sit in potestate cause mutabilis; sed divinum prescire est immutabile; quodlibet meum posse est mutabile et mutabiliter posse; igitur contradictio est quod divinun prescire sit in potestate mea.
Dico igitur quod, licet in potestate voluntatis create sit suum agere, tamen tale agere esse verum scitum et volitum a Deo, nullo modo est in potestate voluntatis create. Nec ratio ibi facta habet aliquam evidentiam. Innititur enim huic medio, quod si aliqua consequentia est bona et antecedens est in potestate mea quod contingit. Istud enim falsum est, nec habet colorem, nisi, verbi gratia, causalem, ita quod significabile per anteeedens sit causa significabilis per consequens. Verbi giatia: consequentia est bona: .a. erit, igitur Deus scit .a. fore; sed non est causalis. Unde eodem medio innitendo concludam contra eos sic:
Deus scit .a. fore, igitur .a. erit; consequentia est bona et antecedens est in potestate Dei, igitur et consequens.
Et per hoc patet quod auctoritates odducte non sunt contra conclusionem. Ex hiis igitur sequitur quod nullum significabile complexe positivum vel negativum esse verum est in potestate cause create. Potet, nam quodlibet tale esse verum est eternaliter sicut eterne a Deo scitum, et ipsum esse verum est immutabile sicut et ipsum esse scitum; igitur nullo modo potest esse causaliter in aliquo posse cause mutabilis.
Item, sequitur quod voluntatem creatam agere vel non agere, sumendo pro significabili complexe, nullo modo est in potestote voluntatis create.
Patet, quia, sic sumendo, sumitur in esse veri.
Item, sequitur quod nulla propositio potest esse vera ex agere aliquo esse mutabili vel creato.
Patet, nam nulla talis propositio potest esse vero nisi quia sic est in re; sed sola causa immutabilis est veritas qua verum est sic esse in re; igitur sola est causa quare talis propositio est vera.
Et sic sequitur consequenter quod sola veritate increata et eterna omnis propositio creata denominatur vera, quio propositio ideo dicitur vera quia sic est in re; sed sic esse est a prima veritate; igitur, etc.
Dico igitur quod quelibet propositio creata, si sit vera, hoc est solum per denominationem extrinsecam, puta sui significabilis, quia significat vere sic est; igiitr, sicut significabile non est verum nisi denominatione extrinseca veritatis prime in esse veri, ita nec ipso; igitur, etc.
Nona conclusio: Generaliter per prius divina essentia est ad extra causaliter contentiva quasi sit ad extra scientia seu ratio cognitiva.
Potet, nom per hoc divina essentia cognosceris se cognoscit extra se et est scientia ipsorum, quia causaliter in se continet, sicut principium conclusiones.
Decima conclusio: Omnis ratio causalis ad extra et sola talis est intellectui divino evidentia et ratio cognitiva ad extra.
Patet ex precedenti conclusione.

Secundus articulus.
Utruni prius sit voluntatem divinam respectu verorum contingentium predeterminari intrinsece quam intellectum divinum huiusmodi vera scire?
Pro quo declorando sit hec
Prima conclusio: Eadem ratio formalis Deo intrinseca est velle respectu cuiuscumque veri contingentis ad extra et dicere intellectui divino respectu eiusdem. Et loquitur hic de veris proprie sumptis que non sunt enunciativa peccata et deformitates, nam respectu talium nuillam est velle vel divinum dicere proprium.
Probratur igitur sic conclusio. Solum velle divinum est determinatio causalis ad extra, ut patet. Sed dicere divinum est causale et determinativum ad extra quia “dixit et faeta sunt”. Igitur velle et dicere nullo modo determinantur in divina essentia respectu contingentis ad extra.
Secunda conclusio: Quelibet talis ratio divina que est predeterminatio causalis ad extra prius naturaliter est dicere quam velle.
Probatur. Nam quelibet talis ratio eadem in se est presens utrique potentie intellectus et voluntatis; sed intellectus divinus prius est naturaliter quam voluntas, et per hoc dicitur dicere, quia est actus intellectus, et dicitur ve!le, quia est actus voluntatis; igitur, etc.
Aliqui tamen dicunt quod prius est divinum velle ad extra quam scire, innitentes huic medio: intellectus divinus est potentia naturalis et ideo pure naturaliter scit et necessario, quapropter eius contingentia in sciendo oportet quod sit ex determinatione previa voluntatis. Et dicitur quod hoc est verum; sed ex hoc non sequitur quod prius est volens quam sciens, sed bene sequitur quod prius talis determinatio est a volontate divina, eum quo stat quod eadem ratio determinativa prius est actus perceptivus memorie, puta scire, et secundo, actus perceptivus intelligentie, puta dicere, et tertio, actus volontatis, puta volitio, sicut est de qualibet ratione communicabili in divina essentia. Unde est sciendum quod voluntas divina ad suum velle ad extra vel nolle potest habere duplicem habitudinem, vel potentia causalis et libera, vel vitalis et perceptiva. Primo modo, intellectus divinus determinatur quodammodo antecedenter et causaliter per voluatatem divinam et huiusmodi vera et actus voluntatis ad extra isto modo respicit principium volitivum ut causam et idem actus est causa quare intellectus divinus sit prius unum verum contingens quam suum contradictorium. Sed secundo modo procedunt conclusiones.

Tertius articulus.
Utrum vera contingentia de creaturis infinite determinetur causaliter et antecedenter per scire divinum?
Pro cuius declaratione sit hec
Prima conclusio: Nulla ratio divina contingens ut sic est causalis ad posse esse effectus.
Probatur. Nam sit .a., aliqua talis ratio, sit .b., effectus per a. determinatus ad fore, et .c., effectus possibilis, qui non erit vel fuit; tune sic: .c. habet eque possibile esse sicut .b.; igitur, eum sibi nulla talis ratio correspondet in Deo qualis est .a., sequitur quod .a., non est ratio causalis per quam .b. habet posse esse.
Secunda conclusio: Nulla talis ratio determinata voluntatis divine est ratio activa immediate ad extra.
Patet, nam nulla talis ratio contingens in Deo determinat voluntatem divinam formaliter posse agere. Probatur, nam sit .a., voluntas divina, .b., ratio talis determinans voluntatem divinam respectu .c. effectus ad extra; tune sic: si .a. esset principium naturaliter activum respectu .c., .a. posset immediate producere .c. sine .b., sed per hoc quod .a. est principium liberum non est remissius activum; igitur, etc.
Tertia conclusio: Nullus effectus creabilis (causalis) est minus distanter causaliter et active in voluntate divina per determinationem vuluntatis divine quam ipsa subducta.
Patet ex priori, nam voluntas divina non est magis activa ad esse effectus mediante sua determinatione quam ipsa circumscripta; igitur.
Quarta conclusio: Nullus effectus per determinationem voluntatis divine hahet proprie et causaliter suum esse, distinguendo determinationem contra voluntatem.
Patet, nam nullus effectus potest esse ab aliquo quod non habet esse activum respectu talis effectus. Verumtamen est notandum quod, sicut causa eodem numero et sub eodem gradu existens potest intensius et remissius agere per maiorem appropinquitatem ad passum, non quod propinquitas sit ratio activa talis esse, sed quia per propinquitatem maiorem sua causalitas melius applicatur ad effectum, ita est in agentibus liberis, nam talis determinatio, licet non sit sibi ratio activa ad agere nec per ipsam intensius sit activum, tamen per ipsam sua eausalitas que est ex se indifferens applicatur ad actionem effcetus et sic determinatio ista est dispositio causalis, quia per ipsam immediate applicatur causalitas principi activi et per consequens est precise formalis ratio volunlatis divine, quoniam per ipsam voluntas determinatur formalier et non efficienter ad esse effectus.
Quinta conclusio: Respectu cuiuslibet effectus ad extra, tam ad esse quam ad fore, necessario est previa determinano causalis voluntatis divine.
Patet, nam voluntas divina est ex se indifferens ad extra igitur ad hoc quod sua causalitas determinetur et applicetur requiritur determinatio voluntatis divine.
Sexta conclusio: Respectu nullius effectus creati ad posse esse vel posse non esse antecedit causaliter aliqua determinatio voluntatis divine.
Probatur. Nam nullus habet posse esse vel posse non esse ex volizione divina, cum effectum sic posse esse sit necesse esse et talis volitio sit contingens ad extra.
Septima conclusio: Omnis determinatio antecedens respectu effectus ad qualitercumque esse vel non esse est habitudo causalis in causa respectu effectus, qua posita eum omnibus previis circumstantibus causalibus propriis, non stat effectum non sic esse.
Patet, nam aliter talis causa respiceret oppositum effectum et effciens, et ita non determinaret antecedenter effectum ad sic esse plusquam ad sic non esse.
Octava conclusio: Quantam contingit esse latitudinem causalitatis naturalis ad agere tantam precise necesse est esse latitudinem determinationis naturalis proprie ad agendum.
Probatur. Nam quelibet causa naturalis secundum ultimum sui generaliter determinatur ad agere; igitur quelibet talls causa quam precise habet de latitudine causalitatis tam de latitudine naturalis determinationis ad agere.
Nona conclusio: Causa prima simpliciter, si esset naturaliter activa ad extra, immense esset naturaliter omnis effectus determinativa, ita quod ad omnem effectum esset immense determinatio.
Patet ex quo esset immensa causa et immense ex se activa.
Decima conclusio: Prima causa simpliciter eque est determinatio antecedens cuiuscumque effectus nunc, sicut si esset causa naturalis.
Probatur. Nam voluntas divina immensa est volitio cuiuscumque effectus sicut immensa est scientia; igitur immense est determinatio antecedens respectu euiuscumque effectus. Consequentia patet, nam per idem est determinatio ad esse et non esse effeetus per hoc quod est volitio vel nolitio talis effectus.
Secondo. Omnis denominatio intrinseca Deo vel ratio que ponit aliquem gradum ut sic necessario est in Deo sub grado immenso; sed voluntatem divinam determinari respectu cuiuscumque ad estra est huiusmodi; igitur, etc.
Undecima conclusio: Respectu cuiuslibet effectus ad qualitercumque esse vel non esse contingenter voluntas divina est in se predeterminatio antecedens.
Patet, nam infrustrabiliiter voluntas divina nunc predeterminat communem effectum sicut si esset causa formalis.
Duodecima conclusio: Divina scientia respectu cuiuscumque veri ad quod se habet causaliter ad extra est immense antecedenter et causaliter determinativa.
Probatur. Nam divina scientia respectu cuiuscumque talis veri est immense scientia et non est respectu eius scientia nisi per hoc quod causaliter determinat tale verum; igitur, etc.
Similiter. Divina essentia eque est scientia cuiuscumque veri ad extra, sicut si necessario determinaretur ad tale verum; sed tunc immense determinaretur; igitur et nucn; igitur, etc.

Quartus articulus.
Utrum huiusmodi predestinatio causalis divine scientie respectu verorum contingentium ad extra excludat in causis secundis liberis aliquam indifferentiam seu aliquam contingentiam ad agendum?
Pro euius decisione sit hec
Prima conclusio: Possibile est in creaturis esse potentias formaliter liberas.
Probatur. Nam omnis perfectio divina per partecipationem communicabilis ad extra; sed divina scientia habens in se potentiam activam formaliter liberam ad estra dicit in divina essentia perfectionem simpliciter; igitur, etc.
Secunda conclusio: infinita potest esse in creaturis latitudo libertatis et contradictionis ad agere.
Probatur. Nam infinita potest esse in crealuris latitudo potentie volitive sicut et latitudo intellectualis nature; igitur, etc.
Tertia conclusio: Sub omni gradu citra gradum libertatis divine voluntatis ad extra et indifferentia ad agendum est causa seconda in latitudine intellectualls substantie.
Patet, na, quilibet gradus libertatis citra immensum et consimiliter indifferentia ad agendum est communieabilis ad extra latitudini possibilis substantie.
Quarta conclusio: Cuilibet substantie intellectuali create vel creabili, si sit, proportionaliter correspondent gradus in latitudine intellectualis nature et gradus libertatis indifferentie.
Patet, nam quelibet substantia intellectualis secundum quod habet de latitudine intellectualis nature, ita correspondenter de latitudine modi principiandi contradictionis, curo secundum quantificetur per primum.
Quinta conclusio: Sola voluntas divina est slmpliciter libera libertate contradictionis, vocando libertatem simpliciter libertatem per plenitudinem quoad gradum.
Patet, quia quelibet citra ipsam solum habet per participationem.
Sexta conclusio: Sola libertas contradictioni secunduni quid, loquendo conformiter de libertate, admittit imputabilitatem ad esse meriti.
Patet, nam sola voluntas subordinabilis alieni potest habere huiusmodi imputabilitatem.
Septima conclusio: Quelibet intellectualis substantia habet libertatem contradictionis equalem simpliciter.
Patet, nam sicut in voluntate divina est eadem ratio causalis formaliter per quam voluntas est potens agere et potens non agere; et ideo ex se est eque indiffercns in utrumque terminum contradictionis.
Octava conclusio: Nulli gradui libertalis contradictionis in creatura quantumcumque remisso correspondet ex hoc aliquis gradus necessitatis contingentie antecedenti opposite.
Patet, nam nullus talis gradus quantumcumque sit remissus est ex hoc niagis ex se determinatus ad agere quam ad non agere vel magis potens ad unum quam ad reliquum, quia tolleretur libertas contradictionis: immo talis necessitas in quolibet gradu libertatis finito esset infinitas; esset enim tanta necessitas quanta esset deficentia a libertate que est immensa.
Nona conclusio: Nulla determinatio antecedens in causa libera est aliquo modo respectu intellectus necessitas aliquam partem contradictionis excludens, supponendo quod quedam necessitas antecedens est necessitas naturalis que ex se determinatur ad agere. Et est alla necessitas antecedens proprie dicta, que vocatur necessitas consecutionis causalis ex positione cause cum omnibus previis circumstantibus ad positionem effectus, et hoc reperitur in omni causa libera determinata ad agere.
Probatur conclusio. Et sit .a., aliqua causa libera ex se indifferens ad agere, et .b., determinatio ipsius .a. respectu .c. effectus ad esse .a. igitur per idem formaliter est potens agere et non agere .c. et eque ex se indifferunt et .b. non est ipsa a., ratio activa; igitur a. est eque simpliciter potens facere, sine .b., .c. esse sicut .c., non esse; igitur .c. est eque potens esse sicut non esse; igitur nullam habet necessitatem antecedentem excludentem aliquam indifferentiam ad esse vel non esse.
Decima conclusio: Stat voluntatem divinam infinite antecedenter determinare effectum creatum ad esse, et nullam ex hoc excludere equalem contingentiam in effectu.
Patet, nam talis determinatio in voluntate divina, cum sit libera, nullam in effectu ponit necessitatem.
Undecima conclusio: Quilibet effectus voluntatis divine infinite est contingens equaliter et tamen infinite determinatus antecedenter.
Prima pars probatur. Nam quilibet talis effectus, deducta determinatione voluntatis divine, equalem potentiam ad esse babet et ad non esse et immensam ad utrumque respectu prime cause; sed per determinationem divinam nullum posse voluntatis divine excluditur ab esse vel non esse; igitur, etc.
Duodecima conclusio: Voluntas divina non ex hoc quod est causa, qua posita cum omnibus previis, necessario sequitur effectum esse aliquo modo necessitatis que excludat aliquam in effectu contingentiam.
Probatur. Nam si voluntas divina ex hoc quod est causa etc. necessitat sic effectum, sequitur quod immense ipsum necessitat, quia immense ipsum determinat antecedenter. Consequens falsum, quia immensa necessitas antecedens, si est exclusixa contingentie, infinitam contingentiam et libertatem excludit et sequitur similiter quod tantam contingentiam excludit quantam excluderet si pure naturaliter ageret.
Ex hac conclusione evidenter apparet quod quidam Doctor modernus ponens voluntatem divinam necessitare antecedenter omnem effectum ad esse vel non esse, per hoc quod voluntas divina est causa, qua posita cum omnibus previis quibus agit, necessario et indifferenter sequitur effectum produci, non probabiliter opinatur, nam voluntas divina est causa huius, non tamen ex hoc effectum necessitat et sic descriptio necessitatis antecedentis non est bene per ipsum assignata, sed necessitas antecedens seu determinatio antecedens secundo modo est necessitas consequentie causalis, que nullo modo nccessitat effectum nec aliquam in ipso contingentiam excludit.
Tertia decima conclusio: Voluntas divina per nullam suam determinationem intrinsecam potest voluntatem creatam antecedenter necessitare ad suum liberum agere et hoc necessitate que perimat aliquam libertatem.
Patet ex dictis.
Tamen arguo sic. Si conclusio non sit vera, hoc est quia, sicut dicunt adversari, determinatio antecedens divine voluntatis antecedenter necessitat, et, si sic, sequitur quod omnis determinatio antecedens .a. causam liberam futuram ad agere est sibi necessitas antecedens; sed possibile est Deum creare aliquam causam secundam, que sit determinatio antecedens respecto .a. ad agere; igitur aliqua causa secunda possibilis potest .a. necessitare ad agere; quod est impossibile. Minorem probo, nam inter causalitatem divinam et causalitatem .a. respectu .b., effectus est possibilis causa media preordinabilis causaliter seu essentiallter causalitati .a. et subordinabilis essentialiter causalitati divine. Igitur.
Secundo. Dato opposito conclusionis, sequitur quod voluntas divina tollit in .a. potentiam in oppositum et non quoad substantiam, qua non potest tolli nisi per corruptionem .a., igitur quoad usum vel exitum in actum agendi, et non simpliciter, sed solum stantc huiusmodi determinatione voluntatis divine. Igitur talis necessitatio est solum necessitatio suppositionis, puta stante voluntatis divine determinatione, sed talis necessitatio eodem modo est respectu posse divini; igitur, etc. Similiter voluntas divina necessitatur ad agere; cuius oppositum ipsi ponunt.
Contra istam conclusionem arguit predictus Modernus et primo sic. Voluntas divima omnem effectum potest necessitare ad esse; igitur de facto necessitat. Antecedens probat per hoc quod Stephanus, parisiis episcopus, condemnavit quamdam errorem quod ad hoc quod effectus dicit necessitatem respectu prime cause non sufficit quod ipsa prima causa non sit impediens, sed exigitur quod cause medie non sint impedibiles; error, inquit, quia tunc Deus non posset in aliquem effectum sine causis posterioribus.
Item, Philosophus, 5 Metaphysice, commento 11, ponit quod prius et posterius est illud cuius secundum prevoluntatem necesse est sequi alterum; sed voluntas divina est potentia et prior in agendo quam voluntas creata in resistendo; igitur.
Secondo sic. Nulla voluntas creata est liberior in actibus suis voluntate Christi humana. Sed voluntas Christi fuit generaliter necessitata ad nunc suum agere liberum; igitur, etc. Minor probatur ex dictis Anselmi Cur Deus Homo in diversis capitulis; patet etiam per illud Salvatoris, Io 5, 30: “Non possum a me ipso facere quidquam”.
Tertio. Cuiuslibet confirmati voluntas necessitatur ad beatificum actum suum et non per aliquid creatum vel creabile, naturale vel supernaturale. Nullum enim tale necessitare potest; igitur, per velle increatum; sed tale velle agere est efficax et infrustrabile respectu cuiuscumqne effectus; igitur, etc.
Ad istas rationes. Ad primam, nego assumptum et ad probationem dico quod ibidem Stephanus loquitur de necessitate consecutionis causalis. Sicut enim Patrem velle quodcumque ad extra infrustrabiliter sequitor Filium idem velle per modum consecutionis principative et originative, et tamen Filium velle summe equaliter est contingens; ita in proposito; et ad istum intellectum videtur loqui Philosophus. Verumtamen quidquid sit de dicto Philosophi, hec consequentia non valet: voluntas divina intensius agit determinando volantatem creatam ad agere quam voluntas creata habet potentiam resistivam; igitur ipsam necessitat. Sed oportet adhuc quod ipsa sit potentia resistiva voluntati divine; quod est falsum de quacumque causa inferiori essentialiter subordinata superiori
Ad secondam, dico quod voluntas Christi humana non fuit necessitata necessitate antecedentis nec necessitabilis fuit. Et ad dicta Anselmi et ipsiusmet Christi, dato quod ista necessitas non est nisi necessitas illationis et consecutionis principaliter, et ita potest dici de beato confirmato in actu beatitudinis. Non enim est ibi necessitas aliqua que excludat contingentiam aliquam, plus quam in suppositis divinis productis sed sola necessitas consecutionis causalis que omnimodam secum corripatitur libertatem
Quarta decima conclusio: Accipiendo necessitatem antecedentem pro necessitate consecutionis causalis effectus ex causa, licet improprie, tamen ad usum loquendi sanctorum, voluntas divina respectu cuiuslibet effectus ad extra ac agere cuiuscumque secunde cause est generaliter necessitas antecedens.
Probatur. Nam ista consequentia est causalis: Deus scit, dicit vel vult rem esse ad extra, igitur .a. est; igitur voluntas divina per suum velle est necessitas antecedens ad .a. esse.
Contra istam conclusionem arguit idem Doctor sic. Nam si esset iterum necessitas consequentie, ita futura necessario devenirent respectu creaturarun inferiarum et secundarun, sicut superiorum et per se, nam lex conditionalis est necessaria: creatura prescit hoc fore, igitur hoc erit.
Respondetur negando consequentiam, quia nullus ctfeetus respectu creature est simpliciter necessarias secundum consecutionem causalem, cum omnis causa secunda sit frustrabilis et impedibilis in agendo per causam primam. Quando vero dicitur quod ista consequentia est necessaria; creatura prescit hoc fore, igitur hoc erit, sicut de Dei scientia, istud nihil est. Non enim loquor de necessitate consequentie logicalis sed solius consecutionis realis et causalis effectus ex qua. Nullum autem, scire creature infert causaliter a priori suum scitum; puto potius scientia causatur ab obiecto scibili vel scito.


================================================================================

Commentary: John of Ripa and the Metaphysical Perspective of Contingency


DISTINCTIO 38
QUAESTIO SECUNDA

Circa eamdem distinctionem quero istani questionem:
Utrum divina essentia respectu futurorum contingentium sit evidens et clara notitia?
Iuxta questionem quatuor erunt articoli.
Primus articulus erit ostendere
Si divina essentia sit omnium futurorum verorum notitia et per quid ut per rationem cognoscendi.
Pro cuius declaratione st hec

Commentary: We see that John of Ripa uses his usual analytic method: before he demonstrates that a thing cannot be in all a series of ways and because of a series of reasons, and after he indicates the only remaining reason and demonstrates briefly its uniqueness.
In the divine essence, none of the following are NOT reasons of knowing with certitude future contingents:
Immensity in time and duration
Immensity of the divine intellect as such
Intensive immensity
Personal (or supposital) reason
Essential ratio which express a perfection in a simple way
Simple perfection
Some intrinsic reason
The divine essence is reason of knowing true contingents, only by means of reason intrinsic and contingent in itself and exclusivly causal. Therefore, the divine essence can be evident knowledge of true propositions about contingency by means of none of the previous reasons but only by means of a intrinsic contigent (or free) reason.


Prima conclusio: Eternitas divina non ex hoc quod durative immensa est evidens ratio cognoscendi futura.
Patet, nam divina eternitas non est simul presens toti fluxui immaginario temporis, immo nec diversis instantibus, sicut patuit distinctione nona. Aliter enim esset preteritum vel futurum respectu eternatati realiter et per consequens agere contingenter vel necessario Deus respiceret futurum sicut preteritum et e contra et equalem respectu utriusque libertatem haberet; quod non reputo probabile.

Commentary: the divine essence is reason of knowing future things, but not because it is eternal in time duration. Indeed the divine essence in only actual and present and it does not exist in any past or future moment, because, in that case, it would have the ability to act and an equal freedom towards the past and the future. Therefose it must be exluded that the eternity of the divine essence has a dealing with its being a reason of knowing future things.

Seconda conclusio: Immensitas intellectus divini ut sic non potest esse sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam, quantumcumque intellectus divinus ponatur immensus in esse potentie perceptive et cognitive, adhoc non ex hoc habet quod distincte cognoscat nedum vera contingentia de rebus creatis, sed etiam ipsasmet entitates creatas incomplexe. Unde intellectus divino ut potentia cognitiva non habet continentiam perfectionalem vel causalem respectu creature nisi secundum rationem in creatura denominationis consimilis, nam intellectus divinus, licet ut potentia intellectiva immensa contineat perfectionaliter et exemplariter totam latitudinem potentie intellective causalis ut sic et ideo secundum hoc sit ratio idealis sibimet cognoscendi totam huiusmodi latitudinem, non tamen est ratio perfectionaliter continendi sive causaliter omnem aliam perfectionem causalem.
Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic. Quodlibet verum eo ipso quod est verum est scibile et eo ipso ab immensa intelligentia est intelligibile, et quia, posita ratione sue immensitatis, est somme actualis, ideo eo ipso ipsum intelligeret; et ideo prima intelligentia, quantumcumque poneretur non activa, adhuc intelligeret omne verum contingens, si tale poneretur. Ad istam rationem dico quod, licet .a. intelligentia sit somme actualis, tamen veri non esset causativa ad extra, sicut non esset aliis causa essendi, ita ipsa non relucerent in sua essentia et per consequens non intelligeret talia vera ad extra per soam existentiam.

Commentary: The divine immensity cannot be the reason of knowing the future contingents. Some perceptive and intellective powers are associated to this immensity and some other power is not associated so that, lacking this power, the immensity of the divine intellect is not reason of knowing the contingent truths. The divine intellect is a cognitive and intellective power, but it does not have any ability to induce perfection or to be cause for a contingent creature. The divine intellect has a capacitive and perfective ability towards things, because it contains the exemplaries of the things; since it contains the ideas or the archetypes or the exemplary models of the things, the divine essence contains in a perfect way the common denominations of the things; since it contains the exemplaries of the things, it contains also in perfect way the ability to cause them according to these perfect archetypes; and these two perfective and motive contents perfettivo are acquainted of each other. But some other perfection does not have the same motive. [My Hypothesis on John]: (following the definition of true as what is in compliance with the facts): if, as reason of knowing the future things, it were reason of their being true and therefore of their being future in the same way they were conceived by the divine intellect, the divine essence would be active power; but the divine essence cannot be an active power, but only a perceptive one; therefore it cannot be but perceptive of their only exemplaries.

Tertia conclusio: Divina essentia non ex hoc quod est intensive immensa potest esse evidens ratio cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam divina essentia secundum quamlibet perfectionem simpliciter est intensive immensa ei tamen non quelibet huismodi ratio est sibi sufficiens evidenter cognosecndi huiusmodi vera nec eidem necessaria vera nec omnia Vera incomplexe signabilia ut patet ex preedentibus; igitur, etc.

Commentary: the intensive immensity of the divine essence is reason of knowing neither the contingent future nor the necessary future, hoewever the are known as terms or propositions.

Quarta conclusio: Divina essentia secundum nullam rationem intrinsecam soppositalem potest esse veri contingentis evidens ratio seu notitia.
Patet, nam nulla talis ratio potest esse formalis notitia intellectui divino.

Commentary: One personal divine reason (one person whatever among the three) is neither reason of truth nor a knowledge with certitude of a proposition about contingency. Indeed, a personal reason is not in any way a forma concept for the divine intellect.

Quinta conclusio: Secondum nullam rationem essentialem que dicat perfectionem simpliciter divina essentia potest esse veri contingentis evidens notitia.
Patet, nam cum qualibet tali eque stat suum oppositum esse verum sicut ipsum.

Sexta conclusio: Non ex hoc quod divina essentia est universaliter perfecta est evidens ratio cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam sit .a., quoddam verum contingens; tunc sic: stat divinam essentiam simpliciter esse perfectam et ipsam non representare .a.; igitur, etc. Antecedens probatur, nam si non, igitur quam contingens vel necessarium est divinam essentiam representare a., tam contingens vel necessarium est divinam essentiam esse simpliciter perfectam; igitur divina essentia vel necessario representat .a. et per consequens .a. necessario erit, vel divina essentia potest esse non simpliciter perfecta.

Commentary: the divine essence is perfect in a simple way, i.e. whatever is in it is identical in it to itself in a perfect way. It is therefore required the divine essence, as perfectly simple, to be reason of representing a certain A. Therefore the conclusion is presented in the following conjunction form: the divine essence is simply perfect & does not represent A. The latter be true. Therefore, since the divien essence is perfect in a simply way, it is such either in a contingen way, and in this case in an equally contingent way it is representation of A, or in a necessary way, and in this case in an equally necessary way it is representation of A. But, unless to deny that the divine essence is not simply perfet, we must admit that it represents A in a necessary way, so that A is not contingent but necessary. This does not mean that the divine essence, as perfectly simple, represents A and therefore there is a necessary A, but rather that it cannot be reason of a contingent A; infact we did not say that the divine essence, since it is simply perfect, represents A in a necessary way, but we only said that it cannot be that the divine essence represents A in a contingent way.

Septima conclusio: divina essentia secundum nullam rationem intrinsecam est sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi aliqua vera contingentia.
Patet, nam, quaecumque tali ratione cum stat equaliter cuiuslibet contingentis oppositum esse verum sicut ipsum.

Octava conelusio: Secundum rationem intrinsecam contingentem et solum secundum causalem est sufficiens evidentia cognoscendi vera contingentia.
Probatur. Nam intellectus divinus cognoscit vera contingentia, et non per aliquod extrinsecum divine essentie quod ad huiusmodi visionem concurrit nec formaliter nec causaliter; igitur solum per suam essentiam et sibi intrinsecam, et non per aliquam rationem necessariam, ut patet ex dictis; igitur per solam rationem contingentem ut causalem evidentiam infallibilem apparentiam de tali vero. Dico autem hic “rationem contingentem” istam, scilicet, que contingenter denominat formaliter et intrinsece divinam essentiam. Unde, licet quelibet ratio intrinseca divine essentie sit realiter ipsamet divina essentia, et per consequens quedan entitas absolute necessaria, tamnen secundum suum proprium esse formale et denominationem intrinsecam correspondentem contingenter.

Commentary: The divine essence, therefore, is reason of knowing true contingent propositions only in virtue of its reason intrinsic and contingent as well. Therefore, neither by one of the reaons about time immensity, intensive immensity, simple perfection nor by one of its essential reasons, the divine essence is reason of knowing contingents truths. In order to find how the divine essence can be knowledge of future contingent, we must find out that intrinsic reason. Just from the beginning we cannot doubt that this causal reason is contingent as well; moreover, any estrinsic reason can be, in particular for the divine essence, neither formal concept nor cause of knowledge; therefore it is necessary this contingent reason of knowledge to be intrinsic. In other words, it seems that an act formally contingent in the divine essence is required to be reason of knowing a created contingent, or rather it is radically claimed that the reason which is in the divine essence reason of knowing the contingent truths, must be contingent not simply as far as its objective content is concerned (that is what is shown to the prospect of the divine intellect), but rather as far is formal being is concerned; it is therefore clear that the act itself of thinking about a contingent truth must be formally contingent as well. It is therefore important to distinguish hereby between the formal and the objective concept; in fact, if the contingency were concerning the objective content, it could be objected that, since God thinks in a necessary way, it is therefore necessary that contingent future must be true, but in this way the essence of the contingency would be lost; on the contary, in order to have a contingency fully completed and guaranteed in the creature, it is necessary the future contingent in the divine intellect to be not only contingent in its onjective content (or to be represented as continent), but to be also contingently represented. Since properly the formal concept, i.e. the act of quality in the divine intellect, is formally contingent in itself, it is representation of a contingent or it can be said to be representation of the contingency. In this case only the divine essence can be said to be reason of knowing the true contingent. Therefore, a formal adequation is needed between the divine essence (as reason of knowing the contingent) and the contingent itself (as contingent real creature). But how can a formally contingent reason exist even in the divine essence? Aren't we rather persuaded that the divine essence is necessary in an absolute way? It is clear that it is necessary in an absolute way, but this rather means that it is necessary towards everything without the occurrence of something else, i.e. that the divine essence is necessary in itself. However, the fact that it is self - causing and self - determinating does not imply that it has constraints in itself. The divine essence, according John of Ripa, determins itself formally contingently; this means that according to its formal & intrinsic (i.e. seen by inside, ex parte dei) being, it gives to itself a contingent denomination. Roughly said, from the divine point of view, the divine essence can behave freely and it behaves freely; from the outside point of view, it has a necessary being. But its intrinsic freedon is consistant with its overall necessity.

Nona conclusio: Cuilibet vero contingenti enuntianti aliqualiter esse vel formaliter de creatura correspondet in divina essentia ratio genitiva necessario inferens a priori tale verum.
Probatur. Nam quodlibet verum extrinsecum relucet in divina essentia a priori causaliter tanquam verum secundarium in primo vero; igitur, cuilibet tali correspondet in divina essentia aliqua ratio a qua habet esse verum tanquam a causa et a priori causaliter necessario inferente huiusmodi verum.

Commentary: in other words, if that reason could be known before the act, it would be necessary to infer that the act is future. Therefore the future act is contingent not because it is created as such, but rather because it is contingent in the divine essence the formal concept to which it corresponds. It is clear that John brings to the extreme consequences the adequation between the contingency of the formal concept, to which corresponds an objective representation of the created thing, and the contingency of the thing itself; the contingency properly free is the formal contingency of the free divine intellection, whereas in the existence of the thing there is only a constrained contingency, or necessited or inferred contingency. The created object is contingent but it is not free in its contingency; in other words, it is contingent because it cannot be necessary; the contingent formal concept in the divine intellect is truly contingent because it is properly free, nevertheless it is absolutely necessary. The contingency has therefore two meanings: in the divine essence "contingent" means free but it does not say an absolute non-necessity in God, whereas in the creature "contingent" means non-necessary but it does not imply any freedom.

Decima conclusio: Cuilibet tali vero correspondet in divina essentia huiusmodii ratio et evidentia et in hoc prima est et summa contingentia.
Patet, nam, sicut antecedens necessarium inferens necessario consequens a priori est magis necessarium quam consequens, ita antecedens causale et contingens est magis contingens.

Commentary: there is, therefore, an order of eminence in the contingency, and in the necessity as well. We must always keep present the principle of the formal adequation. However, the order that ecessity and contingency follow does not seem to be, in John's intentions, an order of essence. In the previous tradition the necessary is primary and noble and the contingency is obtained only by privation of necessity and it is therefore secundary and vile; only from Duns Scotus forth, the contingency begins to be taken in serious account and even to be referred to the divine essence. John follows this new line and gives great importance to contingency, but his position is original. Infact, according to John, necessity and contingency are two modes that can be equally and in the same way attributed and indicated in the divine essence and therefore whatever holds for necessity holds for contingency as well; this last statement, in other words, implies that all the metaphysicial argumentations, like "from the premise x a consequence y can be inferred in z way", z can euqally be "contingent" or "necessary". The metaphysics of the divine essence finds in the future contingency an expansion, since the contingent assumes a reality and a power equal to those properly attributed to the necessary. It is doubtless that Scotus had in this philosophical and theological upgrade a role of first importance. Infact he has renounced to to priority of the necessity in God, but he placed the contingency in the will and left the necessity to the intellection. In John of Ripa this distinction does not exist anymore; the contingency does not stays among the other attributes with infinity, infallibility and so on, but it is rather a mode for these attributes; and such is the necessity as well. This is an original point in John's thought: since in God necessary is a mode equivalent to contingent, both can be way of thinking and willing in the divine essence and consequently ways of being of the thing thought or wanted.
The fact that contingent and necessary are here intended as modes of perfection in the divine essence is supported by the fact that so far John took care of demonstrating that none of the reasons like infinity, eternity etc., i.e. none of the divine attributes, can be reason of knowing contingent truths. Therefore, those attributes are not reasons of knowing necessary truths, but again necessary must e intended as a mode and not as an attribute.


Secundo. Effectus provenit ex modo agendi cause; igitur oninis contingentia in effectu reducitur in causam; igitur cum esse verum contingens de creatura inferatur a priori causaliter ex ratione divina contingenti, que est sibi causalis evidentia, sequitur quod in huiusmodi ratione, ex qua necessario sequitur buiusmodi verum contingens, est prima et summa contingentia.

Commentary: we could recall the definition of virtuality as it is given, as I believe, by Bonaventure. Infact, it is virtual presente the effect which stays in the cause, or in the cause the effect exists virtually. Therefore, it seems that not only the effect but its modes stay virtually in the cause as well. Infact, if the cause causes contingently, i.e. its mode of acting is contingent, therefore the virtual mode of the effect virtually contained in the cause is virtual as well. This is perfectly suitable with the principle of the formal adequation we claimed before.

Contra istam conclusionem arguitur sic. Ex ipsa sequitur quod Deus est aliqualis intrinsece et potest non esse talis et per consequens Deus est potentialis intrinsece.
Secundo. Sequitur quod Deus est mutabilis, nam, si Dcus fuit aliqualis intrinsece et nunc non est, talis potest desinere esse talis.
Tertio. Quidquid est aliquale contingenter est ab aliquo tale; igitur, cum quodlibet intrinsecum Deo sit Deus et per consequens non ab alio, sequitur quod nullum intrinsecum Deo potest esse contingens aliquale.

Commentary: here we see the traditional vision of necessary and contingent as attributes of causes and effects. In this view, the cause is more necessary and the effect is less necessary and therefore more contingent, or, in other words, the contingency comes from a diminution of the necessary and it is therefore less perfect and needs something more perfect to exist. Moreover, if we assume the necessity to be the primary attribute of perfect and eternal things, and the contingency to be the proper attribute of causated ed imperfect things, thus the objection (fictiously advanced by John himself) is correct. On the contrary, if we assume the necessary and the contingent as euqivalent formal modes (or formal ways) of the divine attributes, thus the objection must be refused. In this last way, infact, it does not happen that the contingent comes from the necessary, but it rather happens that form a causal reason whose mode is necessity comes a causated reason which is necessary as well, whereas form a causal reason whose mode is contingency comes a causated reason which is contingent as well. Therefore, here we are not talking about necessity and contingency, as essential reasons, but about necessary and contingent as formal modes. However, only between formal modes a formal adequation can exist; infact, if there were formal adequation between the causated effect and the causating reason, thus the eternity would cause the eternity and the increated would cause the increated, which is absurd; on the contrary, if the increated causes by a necessary formal mode the created will be formally necessary, whereas if it causes by a contingent formal mode (i.e. it calls itself a formally contingent cause) the created will be formally contingent.

Pro solutione istorum rationum est primo advertendum quod omnis potentia que est in Deo huiusmodi rationes continens hahet ipsas non ut perfectiones actuales, nam non minus sine eis talis potentia esset perfecta simpliciter, sed solum ut determinationes sue contingentie et indifferentie ad agendum.

Commentary: this term "indifference" is highly clarifying. Infact we recall that John suggests in his Determinationes this sequence of the soul's faculties essentially ordered: memory, intellect and will. We understand that, before being acted (that is of pertincence of will) these reasons are intellected (that is of pertinence of intellect). It is evident, therefore that before being acted, every reason is indifferent towards the way of acting, or, as John calls it, towards the determination according to which it is acted; it is also evident that the modes or determinations of the the action are the "necessary" and the "contingent"; if a reason is indifferent towards acting, i.e. to the ways and formal modes of acting, therefore it is evident that these ways are equivalent, and that there is a state in which the created object is neutral towards being formally necessarily or contingently.

Secundo advertendum quod quantumcumque aliqua ratio sit intrinseca alieni potentie tibi talis maiorem ponat perfectionem in potentia non sequitur in ipsa potentialitas. Ad hoc enim quod concludatur ista potentialitas requiritur quod talis sit actus talis potentie et ipsius perfectio. Et per hoc patet quod secunda consequentia prime rationis non valet. Stat enim aliqod per huiusmodi rationem non esse tale, et tamen ipsum immutatur et in potentialiter tale. Et ta respondetur ad sccondam et primam rationem.
Ad tertiam, dico quod stat aliquid esse somme contingentie aliqualiter intrinsece et tamen non ab alio tale, ita quod ista alietas denotet distinctionem realem, nam voluntas divina est volens ad extra et contingenter et non ab aliquo alio quam a voluntate divina.
Contra modum ponendi eiusdem conclusionis arguitur. Nam ex ipsa sequitur quod in Deo sunt duo principia prima complexe et unum non est reducibile ad reliquum; quod est impossibile. Consequentia probatur, nam primum principium in ordine verorum contingentium non est reducibile ad aliquod verum necessarium, cum ex vero necessario nullo modo sequitur verum contingens, nec principium primum in ordine necessariorum est aliquo modo reducibile ad verum contingens tanquam ad prius, cum verum contingens non possit esse causa veri necessarii.

Commentary: I believe that the two principles meant here by the objector are the necessity and the contingency. However, the opponent falls because he uses the old way that John refuses, according to which necessity and contingency are essential reasons in God, like the love and the sapience; if that way were assumed, the opponent would be right, because although all the divine attributes can be sumed up in one, i.e. the divine infinite intensive perfection, the principles of necessity and contingency could not be sumed up in it. On the contrarty, if we don't speak about necessity and contingency, but he deal with a necessary or a contingent formal mode, the objection is no longer valid, because God can act in different ways and these ways can be so different that they could not be sumed up in one. And why cannot they be sumed up? Because the one is not the increasing or decreasing of the other one. Unlike the formal degress that can be sumed up in one only, because they are degrees indeed and they can be distinguished only by augmentation or division (like one color differs from the other only by the intensity of the light), the modes cannot be sumed up in one only; infact it is simple to realize that the contingency, as a formal way, is not the diminution or the imperfection of the necessity, as a formal way as well, but each one is equally legitimate. Infact, John distinguishes also among the determinations between essential, or formal, reasons, and modes of the essential reasons, and degree of the essential reasons; modes and degrees are completely different, although they both exist in essential reasons.

Secondo sic. Quodlibet verum quod est principium primum in ordine verorum contingentium est intrinsece et immense verum, cum sit ratio cognoscendi intellectui divino alia vera contingentia; sed quodlibet tale enuntiat de Deo aliqualiter esse secondum aliquam perfectionem simpliciter; igitur, aliquod verum contingens est in Deo dicens perfectionem simpliciter; quod claudit contradictionem.
Ad rationes. Ad primam, nego consequentiam et ad probationem dico quod verum primum contingens, licet non inferatur ex vero necessario, tamen aliquo modo emanat ab ipso, quoniam aliquid est causa a priori huius veri contingentis, licet non causa determinans antecedenter ita quod necessario inferat tale verum.
Ad secondam rationem, dico quod stat aliquod esse immensum formaliter verum secundum propria et formalem suam denominationem, et tamen non ex hoc ponere aliquam perfectionem et hoc est generaliter verum cum denominatio consimilis finita non contineretur formaliter vel causaliter in tali denominatione, sicut patet de velle divino et dicere ad extra. Deus enim immense vult ad extra quidquid vult vel dicit, et tamen tale velle et dicere non dicit aliquam perfectionem in Deo distinctam a perfectione potentie intellective vel volitive. Et hoc est quia nullum dicere creature vel velle continetur perfectionaliter vel causaliter in dicere divino ad extra vel velle, nam non minus voluntas divina contineret perfectionaliter et causaliter omnem creaturam etsi Deus nihil ad extra actualiter diceret vel vellet.

Commentary: here we have a further demonstration that the necessity, as John has assumed it so far, neither is a perfection nor expresses it. Infact, God's will is proper and perfect, but the way (by which He wills) neither adds not expresses any perfection or imperfection. In God the will or the speak is perfect and not rather because it is sometimes necessary or contingent. John makes the example about the immense will, when God wills or speaks immensely, this last "immensely" does not express or add any perfection more, because the immensity is not causally or formally contained in what is denominated properly and formally as such. Therefore, as the proper and formal denomination does not add any perfection, the contingency, which is a proper and formal denomination as well, does not express or add any perfection. To will immensely does not espress in God anything more perfect than to will (without "immensely"), thus to will necessarily does not express in God anything more necessary than to will (without "necessarily") and it is not more perfect than to will contingentely, because to will contingently does not imply any imperfection and these two wills are rather perfectionally equivalent.


Secundus articulus.
Utrum huiusmodi rationes cognoscendi futura in divina essentia sint varie ci aliquo modo distincte?
Pro cuius determinatione sit hec.
Prima conclusio: Quelibet ratio contingens et prima in esse contingentie in divina essentia est alicuius indifferentie sue potentie determinativa.
Probatur. Nam quelibet talis ratio est in sua potentia aliquo modo et cum huiusmodi ratio non habeat in potentia previam antecedentem rationem determinantem ipsam ad esse, nam tunc non esset in ipsa prima, igitur talis ratio est determinativa indifferentie sue potentie, et habeiur intentum.

Commentary: A contingent reason which is prime in being contingent, makes some determination, i.e. it is somehow determinative. What is it determinative of?
Any contingent reason is in its power (in the will, I believe) somehow, i.e. in some contingent way; however, the same reason, when it is in a previous power (in the intellect, I deduce, which is indeed neutral towards being formally contingently or formally necessarily in the will), does not have any reason determining towards being or existing. Infact, in the previous power (i.e. previous to that in which it is in a certain way), it does not have any determining reason to its being or any characterizing reason adequate with the necessary or contingent way, but it rather has (accordingly to the previous power in which it is) a reason of neutrality towards both modes; therefore it is necessary that there is a determining reason which determins that contingent reason to be in a certain way, i.e. that a determining reason is required to be determining the power's indifference and to bring such indifference to the determination, overcoming the neutrality and characterizing it in a way or in another.

3 comments:

Ocham said...

Thank you for posting this. I will read it carefully. Note there are a number of scanning errors e.g. 'istani' for 'istam'

Doctorsubtilis said...

Dear Ockham... I tried to correct the major part of them...
I will read it again...
Thanks.

Ocham said...

Hi I created a test page with one of the questions on, with a message for you on the talk page. I made some corrections.


http://www.mywikibiz.com/User_talk:Ockham/sandbox